EUREKA BOOKS (est. 1987)
426 2nd St. Eureka, CA 95501. Map It
(707) 444-9593
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New Arrivals

Cool Stuff from Serendipity

November 19th, 2013  |  by  |  published in Blog, Feature 3, New Arrivals, Serendipity

yumyum-smSince the story ran in the Tri-City Weekly, we’ve had a lot of requests about what we brought back from Serendipity Books, in Berkeley. I have to say, the interest caught us a bit unprepared. But we’re making an effort to pull some of the cool and interesting stuff out of boxes and to put it in the shop. Here’s the first bit: R. Crumb’s 1975 Yum Yum Book, a full-color graphic novel retelling of the Grimms fairy tale about the girl who kissed a frog that turned into a prince. The cheapest copies online are selling for $25. We just opened a box, still sealed from the printer after 38 years! and are selling them for just $12.48.


Booksigning: New Local History Books

February 7th, 2013  |  by  |  published in Events, Local Authors, New Arrivals

Logging Railroads by Katy Tahja and Eureka: Then and Now by Scott Brown

Logging Railroads by Katy Tahja and Eureka: Then and Now by Scott Brown

 

Be sure to drop by Eureka Books during March Arts Alive! (March 2, from 6 – 9 pm). We’re hosting two local authors who will be signing their new books, Katy Tahja’s Logging Railroads of Humboldt and Mendocino County and Scott Brown’s Eureka: Then and Now. As a side note, the Scott Brown who will be signing books is not the Scott Brown who owns Eureka Books (nor is he the former senator from Massachusetts).


USS Milwaukee Commemorative Plaque

November 18th, 2012  |  by  |  published in Feature 3, Humboldt County, New Arrivals

Commemorative Plaque of the USS Milwaukee

Commemorative Plaque of the USS Milwaukee

The Humboldt County Historical Society has just released a special limited edition plaque commemorating the wreck of the USS Milwaukee off the coast of Humboldt Bay in 1917. The event was a slow-motion disaster, bringing thousands of people to the beach to watch. The Milwaukee, a naval cruiser, had come to pull a submarine, the H-3, out of the sand, becoming stuck in the process. The submarine was freed from the shifting sands of the Samoa Peninsula, but the Milwaukee became permanently stuck and it broke in two during a storm. The Navy stripped the ship of everything salvageable. The decks were torn apart by the shop classes of Eureka and Arcata schools.

Local naval historian Wallace Martin, author of Sail and Steam on the Northern California Coast, acquired pieces of the decking cut into thin rectangles, perhaps when he was enrolled in shop at Eureka High School a few years after the Milwaukee ran aground. He and his family carefully preserved these relics of Humboldt County history for more than 85 years. They were donated to the society to make these plaques as a fundraiser.

Each plaque includes a piece of the Milwaukee decking, attractively framed below a photograph of the wreck. An official historical society seal and signature marks these as authentic commemoratives. Only 100 were made.

The Milwaukee plaques are only available at Eureka Books and the historical society. $125


In Their Own Words: Humboldt County Veterans Share Their Memories of WWII

October 29th, 2012  |  by  |  published in Blog, Local Authors, New Arrivals

A new arrival at Eureka Books: a four-DVD set of interviews with Humboldt’s Greatest Generation.


The British Invasion, Harry Potter style

October 1st, 2011  |  by  |  published in Book Collecting, Books, New Arrivals

British editions of Harry Potter by J. K. Rowling

British editions of Harry Potter by J. K. Rowling

We are excited to present our newly acquired collection of British 1st edition Harry Potters in both the children’s and adult designs.  The books are unread and in fine condition.

Do you speak Latin?  We have a 1st edition Harrius Potter et Philosophi Lapis. Irish?  Come check out Harry Potter agus an Orcholch.  Welsh?  We have Harri Potter a Maen yr Athronydd.

If you speak English we have a lot to choose from.  All seven books plus The Tales of Beedle the Bard. Canadian 1st editions also available.

Accio Potter!


Just In: Collection of Watercolor Instruction Books

April 16th, 2010  |  by  |  published in New Arrivals

Art-instruction

We just acquired an 80+ book collection of watercolor instruction books. These are virtually like new and most retail from $25 to $30. We’ve priced them from $10 – $15.


For New Year’s – Vintage Cocktail Book Reprints

December 29th, 2009  |  by  |  published in New Arrivals

Cocktails

Our first shipment of this hard-to-find line of vintage cocktail book reprints sold out quickly at Christmas. We just got new copies in, and in time for New Year’s. These are very detailed facsimiles of rare cocktail books published from the 1860s to the 1940s, with new introductions by leading cocktailians. The publisher is a small outfit in New York. Amazon doesn’t sell these and you can’t get them at Borders or Barnes & Noble. Score one for the scrappy independent bookseller!

From the top, we have

Jerry Thomas. How to Mix Drinks, or the Bon-Vivant’s Companion (aka The Bartender’s Guide). First published in 1862. One of the first cocktail books, and an eye-opening look at drinks that are closer to rot-gut than to today’s artisanal cocktails. Consider #202: Gin and Pine. “Split a piece of the heart of a green pine log into fine splints…take 2 ounces of the same and put into a quart decanter, and fill the decanter with gin. Let the pine soak for two hours, and the gin will be ready to serve.” Of course, there are precursors to modern cocktails and instructions for making cordials. Hardcover. $30

George Kappeler. Modern American Drinks. First published in 1895 and written by the barman at a leading New York hotel. With jazz, cocktails may be one of America’s great gifts to the world (I suppose one should add democracy to the list too) and this book, while not well known, introduces 75 cocktails whose recipes were not previously published. Hardcover. $30

Robert Vermeire. Cocktails: How to Mix Them. First published in 1922. By the bartender of London’s Embassy Club. A good look at the cocktails popular during the Roaring 20s in London, and notable because the author reports the inventors of many drinks, information that might otherwise be lost to time. Hardcover with a dust jacket. $20

David Embury. The Fine Art of Mixing Drinks. First published in 1948, this is a reprint of the 1958 edition. Embury’s work is the classic guide to the cocktail and the beginnings of contemporary mixology. Opinionated and knowledgeable and as influential in the bar world as Julia Child was for American cooking. Hardcover in dust jacket. $30

William Boothby. The World’s Drinks and How to Mix Them. First published in Sacramento in 1891. This is a reprint of the 1908 edition. This is San Francisco’s big contribution to cocktails. Boothby worked in bars all over the bay area, was elected to the California state assembly, and went on to be the bartender at San Francisco’s Palace Hotel. Softcover. $20

Charlie Paul. American and Other Iced Drinks: Recipes. First published in 1902. Most notable for its many engraved illustrations of bar equipment. Card covers. $25

Frank Meier. The Artistry of Mixed Drinks. First published in Paris in 1936, and written by the bartender of the Ritz Bar, in the French capital. An attractive bar book, each page surrounded by a decorative red border. Softcover, $35

Harry Johnson. New and Improved Illustrated Bartenders’ Manual. First published in 1888, this is a facsimile of the 1900 edition. A true bartender’s guide, with information on cashing checks, mortgages, bookkeeping, as well as recipes for drinks. With Jerry Thomas, Harry Johnson was one of the two great bartenders of the 19th century. Softcover, $30.

Jacques Straub. Drinks. First published in 1914. A no-nonsense guide to making 292 cocktails and more than 1,000 drinks, crammed into just 96 pages. Stiff covers, $20

Harry McElhone and Wynn Holcomb. Barflies and Cocktails. Published in Paris in 1927. McElhone was the proprietor of Harry’s New York Bar, in Paris – having had to leave his post at the Plaza in New York due to Prohibition.  Illustrated with delightful caricatures by Holcomb. Hardcover. $30

C. F. Lawlor. The Mixicologist. First published in 1895; this is a reprint of the 1899 edition. One of the few 19th century cocktail books to originate somewhere other than the coasts. This was published in Cincinnati. It may be the only bar book to include a drink made with ambergris, an intestinal secretion of the sperm whale (“Wedding Punch,” p. 21). The book has many ads for Cincinnati businesses, advice to young bartenders, and discourses on wine and other beverages. Card covers. $30

Ensslin, Hugo R. Recipes for Mixed Drinks. First published in 1916; facsimile based on the 1917 second edition. The final bartender’s guide from New York before Prohibition. Relatively little known, it turns out to be the source for more than 100 drinks in Harry Craddock’s Savoy Cocktail Book, *the* guide to cocktails from the Prohibition Era (and therefore published in England). Softcover, $20

O. H. Byron. The Modern Bartenders’ Guide. First published in 1884. Notable for its recipes for making bitters, liqueurs, and cordials. Hardcover, $30

[To place an order, contact Eureka Book at 707-444-9593 or use the email link on our website.]


Limited Edition Classics

October 25th, 2009  |  by  |  published in New Arrivals

Coralie-bickford-smith-book-designs

Just in time for the holidays, Penguin has brought out a limited-edition line of hardcover classics like Great Expectations and Pride and Prejudice. These are lovely books designed by Coralie Bickford-Smith, one of the hottest book designers working today. The books are nicely priced at $20 each. There’s a funny interview with Ms. Bickford-Smith on the Penguin blog, with lots of visual jokes and book humor (if you like that sort of thing).


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