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Book Clubs Save at Eureka Books

June 24th, 2017  |  by  |  published in Arts Alive, Blog, Bookstore, Events, Feature 3

Get 20% off your book club picks with the Book Club Program at Eureka Books. In addition to the discount, the program will give members of a listed book club a discount and help recruit new members.

“Each group has its own flavor and we cater to all kinds,” said Katie McCreary, Manager of Eureka Books. “Some folks love new fiction, some like the latest science writing, and some need a friend to help them through the classics. They can find one of the many local groups or even start their own. All it takes is getting a few people together once a month and a whole new world opens up.”

Eureka Books employee and book club member Solomon Everta added, “I was trying to get through the classics on my own and struggling, but after I joined the North Coast Great Books Discussion Group I’ve found it to be fun and I feel like I’m learning a lot. It’s comforting to know you have friends along for the read.”

Eureka Books is located at 426 Second Street in Old Town, across from the gazebo where you can drop off your book club’s information. Alternately, you can email info@eurekabooksellers.com to sign your book group up for the discount program. See our book club program webpage for details.


Legislators Run from Their Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Law

January 7th, 2017  |  by  |  published in AB1570, Blog, Bookselling

You know a law is bad when the legislators who sponsored it pretend it never happened.

That’s what has happened with California’s new autograph law. (AB1570) The bill’s author, Ling Ling Chang, lost her bid for the state Senate and is no longer in office. But a number of her co-sponsors are still in the legislature.

Here’s what they publicly say about AB1570.

Cristina Garcia (D). State Assembly 58th District and the Democrat that got the law passed (nothing gets passed in the California legislature without a powerful Democrat behind it). Nothing about AB1570 on her website. Her staff told me Ms. Garcia was “too busy” to work on fixing this law.

If you oppose this law, let Member Garcia know about it on Facebook (@cristinagarciaad58) or Twitter (@AsmGarcia)

Joel Anderson (R), State Senate 38th District. On his list of legislative “achievements” as Senate co-author.

If you oppose this law, let Mr. Anderson know you don’t think it’s much of an achievement on Facebook (@senatorjoelanderson) or Twitter (@JoelAndersonCA)

Catharine Baker (R). State Assembly 16th District. No mention of the law on her website.
William C. Brough (R). State Assembly 73rd District. No mention.
James Gallagher (R). State Assembly 3rd District. Nada.
Tom Lackey (R). State Assembly 36th District. Zilch.
Benjamin Allen (D), State Senate 26th District. Zippo.
Tom Berryhill (R), State Senate 8th District. Not a peep.
Janet Nguyen (R), State Senate 34th District. Silence.

 


Not a Coincidence: The Easton Press Has Stopped Shipping to California

January 4th, 2017  |  by  |  published in AB1570, Blog, Bookselling

neil-gaiman-easton

Sign our Change.org petition to repeal this law.

The first consequence of California’s terrible autograph law: the Easton Press has stopped shipping signed books to California. On January 6, we obtained the following statement from the Easton Press, sent to a California collector:

Unfortunately, a law recently passed by the California legislature has made it prohibitively expensive to sell autographed collectibles to customers in your state. The law apparently was written with good intentions to deter sellers of counterfeit celebrity signatures.  However, it was written so broadly that it has added many layers of bureaucracy for legitimate sellers of signed merchandise, like Easton Press.

We are not the only booksellers who are outraged by this law and we are hopeful that the California assembly will hear these complaints and amend the law to provide an exception for the sale of signed books.  If this occurs, we will reach out to you immediately to offer you our signed editions.

California’s new law governing the sale of autographed items requires, among other things, keeping copies of Certificates of Authenticity (COAs) for seven years and printing the address of the signing author on the COA.

A few of the authors affected: Neil Gaiman, Neil deGrasse Tyson, Carol Burnett, and many others.

Please sign our Change.org petition. We need your support to convince the legislature to change the law.

More on AB1570.

This post has been updated several times to add additional information.


AB1570 in Plain English

January 3rd, 2017  |  by  |  published in AB1570, Blog, Bookselling

AB 1570 is a law regulating the sale of signed items in California.

This is a lay persons interpretation and should not be considered legal advice (Life tip: don’t take legal advice from a blog). Read it for yourself.

Who Has to Comply with the Law?

  1. Autograph dealers
  2. Art galleries
  3. Auction houses
  4. Anyone who consigns signed items to auction
  5. Anyone with “knowledge” of signed items, such as professional booksellers and antiques dealers
  6. Anyone offering signed items for sale online (this part is debatable as the law is badly written).

What Kind of Autographs Are Covered?

Anything signed by a “personality” and sold by anyone listed above for more than $5.

What is a personality? The standard dictionary definition is “a person of importance, prominence, renown, or notoriety” or “a famous person, especially in entertainment or sports.” At Eureka Books, we’re defining it as anyone with a Wikipedia entry.

However, the standard legal definition of personality is basically a person: “the quality, state, or fact of being a person.” The Legislative Counsel’s summary of the bill seems to imply this definition, explaining that the law applies to “all autographed items.” (Legislative Counsel’s Digest, paragraph 4). So if you are cautious, everything described as signed should be accompanied by a COA.

What Do You Have to Do?

  1. Issue Certificates of Authenticity, meeting specific requirements, with each signed item you sell for more than $5. The most problematic requirement is the listing of the name and address of your source for the autographed item

COAs must include:
a.    The dealer’s true legal name and street address
b.    A description of the item and the name of the person who signed it
c.    Purchase price and date of sale (an invoice can be substituted for this)
d.    An express warantee of the authenticity of the item
e.    The specifications of the edition size, if part of a limited edition
f.    The item number, if any, from the edition (this must also be included on the invoice)
g.    A notice of whether the dealer is bonded
h.    Last four digits of the dealer’s resale certificate number
i.    An indication of whether the item was signed in the dealer’s presence, and if so, the date, location, and the name of a witness to the signing.
j.    If the item was not signed in the dealer’s presence, the name and address of the person from whom the item was acquired.

Copies of COAs must be kept for seven years. For a bill written by Republicans, this is a particularly ridiculous paperwork requirement for items worth $5.

2. Post the following sign at your place of business (if bricks and mortar):
“SALE OF AUTOGRAPHED MEMORABILIA: AS REQUIRED BY LAW, A DEALER WHO SELLS TO A CONSUMER ANY MEMORABILIA DESCRIBED AS BEING AUTOGRAPHED MUST PROVIDE A WRITTEN CERTIFICATE OF AUTHENTICITY AT THE TIME OF SALE. THIS DEALER MAY BE SURETY BONDED OR OTHERWISE INSURED TO ENSURE THE AUTHENTICITY OF ANY COLLECTIBLE SOLD BY THIS DEALER.”

3. If you exhibit at a show principally devoted to signed items, such as art shows, you must make sure sample COAs are on display at the entrances or you are legally prohibited from exhibiting (see section F of the law).

How Can You Avoid This Law

  1. Don’t sell too many signed items
  2. Don’t represent yourself as an expert. Preface comments about signatures with “I’m no expert, but…”
  3. Avoid statements of facts about signatures, like “Signed by the artist on the lower right corner.” Statements of fact suggest knowledge and if you have knowledge, you’re covered by the law. State, instead, “Appears to be signed by the artist…” or “Signed ‘Jane Doe’ in bottom corner.” Note the difference between “Signed ‘Jane Doe'” and “Signed by Jane Doe.” The first is a statement of fact; the second is a conclusion.
  4. Don’t consign signed items to California auctioneers.

What Do Fair Promoters Have to Do

If you organize a book fair, comic book convention, or art fair where signed items are sold or where autographing sessions will be held, you must:

  1. Issue the following notice to exhibitors when they sign up:
    “As a vendor at this collectibles trade show, you are a professional representative of this hobby. As a result, you will be required to follow the laws of this state, including laws regarding the sale and display of collectibles, as defined in Section 1739.7 of the Civil Code, forged and counterfeit collectibles and autographs, and mint and limited edition collectibles. If you do not obey the laws, you may be evicted from this trade show, be reported to law enforcement, and be held liable for a civil penalty of 10 times the amount of damages.”
  2. Display sample COAs at the entrances.
  3. Post in every booth a sign reading:
    “SALE OF AUTOGRAPHED MEMORABILIA: AS REQUIRED BY LAW, A DEALER WHO SELLS TO A CONSUMER ANY MEMORABILIA DESCRIBED AS BEING AUTOGRAPHED MUST PROVIDE A WRITTEN CERTIFICATE OF AUTHENTICITY AT THE TIME OF SALE. THIS DEALER MAY BE SURETY BONDED OR OTHERWISE INSURED TO ENSURE THE AUTHENTICITY OF ANY COLLECTIBLE SOLD BY THIS DEALER.”

A Reply to The Scrivener and the Seattle Review of Books

October 5th, 2016  |  by  |  published in AB1570, Blog, Bookselling

bookselling-still-legal

Phew! That’s a relief.

That is the headline from earlier today in the Seattle Review of Books, which published a critique of the hue and cry raised over the new California law governing signed items, including books.

The post claims that “the law blog Scrivener’s Error sets that bookstore straight,” asserting that AB 1570 does not apply to bookstores.

As the owner of “that” bookstore, I feel the need to respond.

In the first place, my post was headlined, “Your Signed Books and Artwork Just Got Harder to Sell in California [emphasis added].” My main point is that the law requires me to give your name and address to the buyer of any book you sell me that happens to be signed. The law applies to everything over $4.99. If you sell anything signed at auctionyou have to provide a certificate of authenticity to the buyer. If the item turns out to be a fake or you fail to provide at COA, the buyer can sue you for ten times damages, plus court costs. Before this law, the auction house provided authentication services and stood between you and the ultimate buyer. Not any more.

This law covers anything signed that sells for more than $4.99: used paperback books, signed first editions, greeting cards, paintings, signed prints and photographs, signed glassware, etc. Virtually everyone in California has items that meet that definition, and everyone’s stuff eventually gets sold, either voluntarily or by their heirs.

The Seattle Review of Books and Scrivener’s Error are correct that the new law probably doesn’t apply to general bookstores. I never claimed it did.

What I said and still maintain is that for some of the largest and most important independent bookstores, the law could hamper their ability to host author events. That opinion comes from Bill Petrocelli, an attorney whose wife runs Book Passage, one of the most important bookstores in California. They depend heavily on book signings and could qualify as dealers under the law. Unlike the previous law governing sports collectibles and art multiples, which had no enforcement provisions, this law calls for ten times civil damages, a number that can quickly attract frivolous lawsuits.

As for the law applying to Eureka Books, we are subject to its provisions because we are “experts”, or so we are informed by two different legal counsels. The law therefore applies to everything we sell that is signed.

The issues are complex, but if you want to take a deep dive, complete with sources, please read on.


Your Signed Books and Artwork Just Got Harder to Sell in California

September 26th, 2016  |  by  |  published in AB1570, Blog, Bookselling, Feature 2

John_Hancock_Envelope_Signature

Background on AB1570, a new law covering autographed items in California

More on AB1570 here.

On September 9, 2016, California Governor Jerry Brown signed AB1570 Collectibles: Sale of Autographed Memorabilia into law.

The law requires dealers in any autographed material to provide certificates of authenticity (COA) for signed item sold for $5 or more.

The idea is to crack down on fraudulent autograph sales. “That sounds pretty reasonable,” you are probably thinking. I, too, can get behind the motive.

Unfortunately for you, the consumer, the legislators never seem to have considered that buyers of autograph material eventually become sellers of autograph material.

Let’s say you like to go to author events and get books signed. Eventually, your shelves fill up, and you want to trade books in at a shop like Eureka Books.

Guess what? Remember that Certificate of Authenticity that sounded so reasonable? Well your name and address has to go on the certificate of authenticity because I (as the person issuing the COA) have to say where I got the book. This applies to signed books, artwork, and any other autographed items you own.

[If you are concerned about this legislation, which goes into effect on January 1, 2017, please contact your state legislators]

Maybe you’d like to sell that Morris Graves painting you inherited. You send it to an auction house, where it sells for $40,000. Good for you. But did you supply a Certificate of Authenticity? What? Why do I have to issue a COA? What do I know about authenticating Morris Graves paintings?

Guess what? AB1570 requires YOU, as the owner of the painting, to guarantee its authenticity. And you don’t issue the COA? You can be liable for TEN TIMES damages, plus attorneys fees. Call it a cool half mill, because you didn’t know you were supposed to issue a COA.

Maybe you decide to sell it at an auction house outside of California. Good luck, because if the person who buys your painting lives in the Golden State, the law still applies.

Consumers aren’t the only ones significantly affected by this law.

Consider bookstores that do a lot of author events. Let’s imagine that Neil Gaiman does one of his typical massive book signings in February for his forthcoming book, Norse Mythology. Say 1000 people show up and buy books at $25.95. The bookstore either has to issue 1000 COA, or risk being sued for $25.95 x 1000 x 10, plus attorney’s fees. Call it $300,000.

Is it any wonder that many of California’s best bookstores are very worried that this law will make it much harder to hold book signings and other author events. The legislature and the governor apparently had a similar response, because the law was passed with almost no discussion.

Please contact your state legislator.

Sources
“Your name and address has to go on the certificate”: Section 1739.7b(8) says the COA must “Indicate whether the item was obtained or purchased from a third party. If so, indicate the name and address of this third party.”

“Why do I have to issue a COA?”: Section 1739.7a(4)a:  “Dealer includes an auctioneer who sells collectibles at a public auction, and also includes persons who are consignors or representatives or agents of auctioneers.”


Peter Hannaford, 1932 – 2015

September 6th, 2015  |  by  |  published in Arts Alive, Blog, Eureka Books, Local Authors

peter-hannaford-09-05-2015-copyright-Bob-Doran-fb

Peter Hannaford signing his latest book on the night he died (9/5/2015). Photo © 2015 by Bob Doran. All rights reserved.

Local author Peter Hannaford passed away in his sleep on September 5, 2015, after celebrating the publication of his new book at Eureka Books. Peter spent a long career in public relations and politics and was a close adviser to Ronald Reagan for many years. But in “retirement,” Peter devoted himself to a new career as an author, writing and editing books at a pace that writers even half his age would have found challenging. His most recent effort was editing the diaries of the investigative journalist Drew Pearson. The book was literally hot off the press–it won’t even be officially for sale until September 15. But working with Peter and his publisher, the University of Nebraska Press, we were able to host a book-launch for Arts Alive (September 5, 2015).

We had a good turn out and Peter spent the evening talking with friends and well-wishers, and selling copies of his books. We are all shocked and saddened by his passing, but glad he was able to spend his last night doing what he loved, being an author with a new book. Peter was one of those naturally charismatic people who was liked by everyone who met him. He had led a very interesting life and was an endless source of stories, but even with his 83rd birthday just weeks away, he was still thinking about what was next. His was a full life, lived fully, and there is a lot to admire in that.—Scott Brown, co-owner of Eureka Books

Recent Humboldt County Media for Peter’s book, Washington Merry-Go-Round
For the next few days, you will still be able to listen to the radio interview Peter recorded on KHSU’s Home Page on Wednesday (audio files are available for two weeks).

A profile of Peter ran in the Times-Standard on Saturday.

The photograph of Peter Hannaford, taken during his book signing is courtesy of Bob Doran.

Revised Sept. 9, 2015

Memorial Service
Peter Hannaford’s memorial service is at 2 p.m. on Saturday, September 12 at Christ Episcopal Church, 15th & H Streets, in Eureka. The service is open to the community.

Signed Books: We are out of signed copies of Washington Merry-Go-Round (sorry). We do have a few other books signed by Peter. Call 707-444-9593 for information.

Obituaries and Memorials

National
Washington Post
A proper obit

Washington Times – Describing Peter’s early career with Reagan and his speach-writing

National Review  – On Peter’s role developing Reagan’s weekly radio addresses, which all subsequent presidents have continued.

The Spectator – How Peter helped Ronald Reagan get elected, by keeping him in the public eye during the 1970s.

Breitbart.com – Re-hash of Times-Standard story

Local
Eureka Times-Standard
North Coast Journal
KIEM-TV

Last Column
Peter filed this story with The Spectator on the Friday before he passed away: Misspelled Words Give Me LOL

Comments may be left on our FaceBook page.


Peter Hannaford Signs Washington Merry-Go-Round Sept. 5

August 23rd, 2015  |  by  |  published in Arts Alive, Blog, Events, Local Authors, New Arrivals

Peter Hannaford Washington Merry Go Round: The Drew Pearson Diaries, 1960-69

Eureka author and long-time aide to Ronald Reagan Peter Hannaford will sign his latest book (his 12th) during Arts Alive on September 5, from 6:00 – 9:00 p.m.

Washington Merry-G0-Round, edited by Hannaford, is the diaries of noted journalist Drew Pearson from the turbulent 1960s. Pearson was the best-known investigative journalist of his time and counted presidents, senators, and cabinet officials as confidants and sources. This important new book is published by Potomac Books, the political imprint of the University of Nebraska Press.


Atthys Gage to Sign New Young Adult Novels

August 23rd, 2015  |  by  |  published in Arts Alive, Blog, Eureka Books, Events, Feature 2, Feature 3, Local Authors, New Arrivals

Cover of Spark, the novel by Arcata, CA, resident Atthys GageOn Saturday September 3, Eureka Books will host a book signing by Arcata resident, Atthys Gage, who  has authored two novels, Spark and Flight of the Wren.  Copies of both books are now available in the store.

Atthys is a musician as well as a writer with a lifelong love for myth, magic, and books. His second real job was in a book store. As was his third, fourth, fifth, and sixth. Eventually he stopped trying to sell books and, about nine years ago, started
writing them. After studying classics at Haverford College, he developed an interest with the ways that ancient stories influence modern storytelling and has always had a fascination for that cloudy borderline between the normal and the paranormal.

Both novels feature a young protagonist, are set in contemporary culture, and mix magical realism with elements of romance, mystery, history, and adventure. Reviewers have described the books as “wonderfully inventive with compelling characters,” “totally engrossing,” “the writing is elegant and evocative,” and “lovely writing with a sense of humor.”

Athys’s reading audience is for those interested in exploring the world of the paranormal in the modern world. Adults and young adults both are drawn to his characters and stories.


Go Set a Watchman by Harper Lee

June 26th, 2015  |  by  |  published in Blog, Events, New Arrivals

watchman-homepageOn July 14, after 55 years, the beloved author of To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee, will publish her second novel. Go Set a Watchman explores the same events as To Kill a Mockingbird, but from an adult’s perspective. Lee actually wrote this novel first, but it was never published and the manuscript had been lost until recently.

In honor of this exciting new book, Eureka Books and the Eureka Theater are bringing the Oscar-winning film To Kill a Mockingbird to the big screen, for one night only: Friday, July 17, at 7:30 p.m. Admission is $5, and all proceeds benefit the theater and its restoration (a really good cause!).

When Friday, July 17, 7:30 p.m.
Where Eureka Theater, 612 F Street
What To Kill a Mockingbird, starring Gregory Peck on the big screen

If you buy a copy of Go Set a Watchman from us before the show, we’ll give you a free ticket. So mark your calendars (or call us at 707-444-9593 and reserve a copy of Go Set a Watchman now).

 


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