EUREKA BOOKS (est. 1987)

426 2nd St. Eureka, CA 95501. Map It
(707) 444-9593
   

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Now Hiring an Assistant Manager

July 10th, 2015  |  by  |  published in Bookstore, Feature 3

 

Labor,_Management-sq-smAssistant Manager Position Open

The primary responsibility of this position will be supervising the day-to-day operations of Eureka Books. If something involves a walk-in customer, the Assistant Manager is probably responsible for it. That includes supervising employees, assisting with the selection and purchase of new books and sidelines, merchandising, and helping with buying used books and Internet sales. This is in addition to the sorts of work we all do: customer service, cashier duties, and general bookstore maintenance, such as shelving and organizing.

Applicants should have bookstore or retail management experience. We are especially hoping to find someone familiar with the buying and selling of new books, but people with experience running a retail store, particularly an independent shop with no corporate overlords or fat procedure manual, are encouraged to apply.

To apply (and this is the first test for the position), drop off or mail in a resume and cover letter. The cover letter should provide a summary of your experience and qualifications for the job. We’re in the book business and that means paper. Electronically submitted resumes will get about as much attention as e-books, which is to say the delete key is just one index finger away. While we like paper, we rely on a lot of software programs, so be sure to tell us about your computer experience.

Please don’t spend too much time telling us how much you love books or how you’ve always longed to work in a bookstore. We’ll assume that’s the case, otherwise you’d be applying to work at BevMo. If you are also applying to work at BevMo, good luck, but we’re not looking for someone who simply wants any old retail job.

This is not a cush job, but it is an interesting one (we think). We work hard, all day. You will not have any time to read on the job (a common misconception about bookstores), though we expect you to be the sort of person who reads a lot in your off hours. If we ask you for an interview, be prepared to field a lot of specific questions about this, which thus far no one has faked their way through.

You will also not have time to be bored. You will be challenged constantly and faced with surprisingly complex problems that need to be solved on the fly. On the same day, you may interact with a homeless person, an avid reader looking for advice choosing a title for a book club, a teenager trying to decide what to read after the Divergent series, the curator of a prestigious library, and the odd billionaire.

You will be expected to work at least one weekend day as well as some evenings during tourist season and between Thanksgiving and Christmas. Our regular shift is very civilized: 9:45 a.m. to 6:15 p.m. We work hard to keep everyone’s schedule the same from week to week, but some flexibility in scheduling is required.

The salary for this job is $13.50 to $15.50 per hour, depending on experience. Benefits include health care, 10 days of paid vacation, three days of paid sick leave, a couple of paid holidays, and an iPhone or an iPhone allowance (we do a lot of communicating through iMessage). Two to four hours of overtime is typical each week for the assistant manager, and will be paid at time-and-half. We can also help with relocation expenses.

Like most bookstores, we trend liberal but we are a store and by definition, capitalist, so we actually make some effort to cater to Republicans and Libertarians. (Yes, we have the new Bill O’Reilly book.) We are more likely to talk about the Giants than the Democrats. Openness to a diversity of opinions is required.

The application period starts now and ends when we hire someone. Procrastination is not a qualification for this job.

Eureka Books • 426 2nd Street, Eureka, CA 95501 • 707-444-9593

 


Go Set a Watchman by Harper Lee

June 26th, 2015  |  by  |  published in Blog, Events, New Arrivals

watchman-homepageOn July 14, after 55 years, the beloved author of To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee, will publish her second novel. Go Set a Watchman explores the same events as To Kill a Mockingbird, but from an adult’s perspective. Lee actually wrote this novel first, but it was never published and the manuscript had been lost until recently.

In honor of this exciting new book, Eureka Books and the Eureka Theater are bringing the Oscar-winning film To Kill a Mockingbird to the big screen, for one night only: Friday, July 17, at 7:30 p.m. Admission is $5, and all proceeds benefit the theater and its restoration (a really good cause!).

When Friday, July 17, 7:30 p.m.
Where Eureka Theater, 612 F Street
What To Kill a Mockingbird, starring Gregory Peck on the big screen

If you buy a copy of Go Set a Watchman from us before the show, we’ll give you a free ticket. So mark your calendars (or call us at 707-444-9593 and reserve a copy of Go Set a Watchman now).

 


Why We Don’t Celebrate Banned Books Week

June 23rd, 2015  |  by  |  published in Books, Bookselling

 

[Used without permission. Get your Banned Books Week Swag here.]

[Used without permission. Get your
Banned Books Week Swag here.]

Why We Don’t Celebrate Banned Books Week.

Every September, the American Library Association (A.L.A.) celebrates Banned Books Week. Thousands of libraries and bookstores put up displays of banned books like Huckleberry Finn, The Grapes of Wrath, and Ulysses. Eureka Books never does.

This year’s list (permalink here) of the most frequently challenged books, compiled by the Office of Intellectual Freedom (the A.L.A. unit with the most Orwellian-sounding name), include Sherman Alexie’s The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, Marjane Satrapi’s graphic novel, Persepolis, and A Stolen Life by Jaycee Dugard. The reason these books have been challenged are drugs, sex, and language. Homosexuality, racial slurs, and political viewpoint are other common reasons books are challenged. Challenges are mostly made by parents and community members concerned about books available in libraries and taught in schools.

Did you catch what I did?

I started out talking about “banned” books and then I switched to “challenged” books. Book banning is easy to oppose; challenges, a murky concept as described on the A.L.A. website, are less black and white.

It’s a common ploy, using banned and challenged interchangeably. Pay attention next time you read an article about Banned Books Week. Look at the A.L.A.’s website for the same bait-and-switch maneuver.

Even David Goldenberg, of the myth-busting FiveThirtyEight blog, did it with his recent post, We Tried—And Failed—to Find the Most Banned Book in America. [I attempt answer Goldenberg’s question about the most banned books in America here.]

The reason Goldenberg failed was that the A.L.A. won’t show anyone the data used to compile the list. He finally settles on And Tango Makes Three as probably the most challenged book in America (note the switch, from banned to challenged!). Tango is a picture book about a true story of two male penguins who adopt a baby chick at a zoo. It’s challenged as a gay-lifestyle parable. Really, I’m not making that up.

But here’s the thing, despite being the “most challenged” book in America, Tango has sold hundreds of thousands of copies and has been translated into many languages. This year, look for a 10th anniversary deluxe edition.

Wait a minute. A bestselling banned book? Isn’t that an oxymoron? How can a banned book sell so well?

Here’s how, and it’s the reason we don’t celebrate Banned Books Week at Eureka Books: The books are promoted and sold as “banned” books, and readers are encouraged to “celebrate the freedom to read” by buying and reading them. The clear subtext is to encourage a feeling of superiority (“I read banned books”) among those of us (me included) with liberal, left-leaning sensibilities.

But superior to whom? To conservative parents who don’t want their children exposed to four-letter words or to the real-life horrors  Jaycee Dugard suffered during her 18 years of captivity.

You or I might disagree with those opinions, but I suspect few parents would object to a high school library turning down a donation of the Fifty Shades of Grey trilogy. Explicit S/M sex scenes probably aren’t appropriate for 14-year-olds.

So if we aren’t going to expose our children at publicly funded institutions to every kind of printed matter, then there have to be standards (spoken or unspoken) about what is and is not appropriate. Discussions and even disagreements about those standards are appropriate topics for parents, schools and libraries to engage in. [Amy Stewart, a co-owner of Eureka Books, weighs in with her perspective as a writer.]

While certain books do get challenged regularly, very few of them are actually banned at the local level. Even if a book is removed from one library or school, it’s not as if the book cannot be found nearby. After all, there are millions of copies of the 2014 top-challenged books in circulation.

I support freedom of expression, but I won’t use Banned Books Week to belittle the heart-felt concerns of people whose political and social values I don’t share. I don’t think they are right to try to remove most books from schools, and I am glad they almost always lose their battles (and they almost always lose).

Ironically, the people who challenge books may have the strongest belief in the printed word—books are so powerful to them that they have to fight against them. That sentiment, even if applied in a questionable way, always gives me encouragement in the day-to-day slog of keeping a bookstore alive and thriving.

**

NOTE: In all fairness, it’s entirely possible that a headline writer came up with the title of Mr. Goldenberg’s 538.com blog post, but it’s a perfect example of how “challenged” books get confused with “banned” books.

 


8th Annual July 4th Dollar Book Sale

June 16th, 2015  |  by  |  published in Arts Alive, Events

Eureka Books 4th of July Dollar Book Sale

This July 4th, during the Old Town Independence Day Street Fair, Eureka Books will host it’s 8th annual dollar-book extravaganza. Everything outside the store will be $1! These are overstock, leftovers from estates we acquired, and books we need to move to make more space. There will be art books, comics, lots of cookbooks, novels, self-help, Spanish language books, books in Japanese, even local history overstock. We’ll move close to 1,000 books from 10 am to 5 pm. Don’t miss it!


New Local History Event, August 1

June 16th, 2015  |  by  |  published in Arts Alive, Blog, Events, Humboldt County, Local Authors

Scotia and Rio Dell by James Garrison

Eureka Books is excited to host James R. Garrison, a recent HSU graduate, on Saturday, August 1, 2015, during Arts Alive! (6 to 9 p.m.). James will be signing his new book on Scotia and Rio Dell. The book will be published in mid-July.


Amy Stewart’s Girl Waits With Gun

June 15th, 2015  |  by  |  published in Arts Alive, Blog, Events, Feature, Local Authors

Girl Waits With Gun by Amy Stewart

Amy Stewart, Humboldt County’s best-selling local author (and co-owner of Eureka Books), has a new book out this fall: Girl Waits With Gun. GWWG, as we’ve been referring to it, is a novel that begins with a crash. A speeding automobile destroyed their horse-drawn carriage in 1914, and what should have been a simple traffic accident led to blackmail, kidnapping threats, and a shoot-out, all of which actually happened. We’ll have signed copies for sale on the publication date, September 1. Amy will give a talk and a reading at the Eureka Theater on October 3 (during Arts Alive).


Read. Swap. Repeat.

May 16th, 2015  |  by  |  published in Arts Alive, Blog, Books, Bookstore, Feature

READ-SWAP-REPEATAt Eureka Books, you can now swap your (gently) used books for almost anything in the store, even new books and most special orders.

Up until now, swap credit was good for used books in the store only. With the new program, you can trade your used books for new books, too. A very few exceptions apply.

In addition to books, swap credit is good for maps, prints, t-shirts, tote bags, pouches and greeting cards.  Nearly everything in the store — and most things we can order — can be bought with swap credit.

So read, swap, and repeat. Expand your mind; help save the planet.


Eureka Books in the Huffington Post

January 27th, 2015  |  by  |  published in Bookstore, Feature 3

 

Eureka Books in the Huffington PostWe’re thrilled to have been selected as one of 10 Beautiful Bookstores That Will Stop You in Your Tracks by AbeBooks, a list reissued by The Huffington Post.


Booksigning of “A Scottish Syndicate in the Redwoods”

December 20th, 2014  |  by  |  published in Arts Alive, Feature, Humboldt County

Scottish-Syndicate-coverSigned copies available.  The book tells the tale of a scam perpetrated by three Humboldt County lumbermen who managed two Scottish-owned timber syndicates.  “Some of the most notorious instances of fraud that the U.S. Land Office uncovered in acquiring public timberland occurred in the redwoods,” said Shepherd.


SIGNED BOOKS AT ARTS ALIVE!

November 10th, 2014  |  by  |  published in Local Authors

Come Join the Party with Local Authors to Celebrate Arts Alive! on December 6.  More than ten authors will be here.  Enjoy the festivities, including wine served by Humboldt County Children’s Author Festival.

Publication3

Schedule

6-7:30 p.m.
Amy & Aiko Uyeki.  Sanae, Senryu Poet: Her Life in 5-7-5.  The Poetry of Shizue Harada
Pam Service.   Alien Contact; A Question of Destiny; Being of Two Minds; Stinker from Space; Stinker’s Return; Storm at the Edge of Time; Tomorrow’s Magic; When the Night Wind Howls; and The Not-So-Perfect Planet.
Greg Rumney & Dave Stockton.  1964 Flood of Humboldt and Del Norte
7:30-9 p.m.
Jerry Rohde,  Mount Rainier National Park: Tales, Trails, & Auto Tours; Best Short Hikes in Redwood National and State Parks; Traveling the Trinity Highway; and Both Sides of the Bluff: History of Humboldt County Places, volume .
Amy Stewart.  The Drunken Botanist: The Plants that Create the World’s Great Drinks; Wicked Bugs; Wicked Plants; The Earth Moved; Flower Confidential; and From the Ground Up: The Story of A First Garden.
Pat Bitton and Lauren Sarabia.  Locally Delicious and Lunchbox EnvyMichael Kauffmann.  Conifers of the Pacific Slope and Conifer Country

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